Diagnostic Testing

    • EKG: Also known as electrocardiogram, the EKG (ECG) documents the electrical events of the heart. It will give information regarding the heart rate, rhythm and possible blockage/old damage.
    • Nuclear Stress Test: This test allows the use a radioactive isotope and a large imaging machine to produce pictures that display the amount of blood flow to the heart. There are two sections of the test, the resting and the stress portion, which simulates exertion. When taking pictures during these two sections, it can show areas of the heart that has damage or decreased blood flow.
    • Treadmill Test: This test is very similar to a nuclear stress test, but excludes the radioactive isotope. The patient will walk on a treadmill while an EKG is recording the heart rate and rhythm.

FDR

    • Echocardiogram: An echocardiogram is an ultrasound that evaluates the pumping function of the heart. It can also determine if there are any valve defects.
    • Carotid Ultrasound: This ultrasound can determine if there is plaque buildup in the carotid arteries of the neck.
    • Venous Ultrasound/Reflux Study: Reflux studies are a special ultrasound that examines the amount of blood flow that is leaking in the veins of the legs. The reflux studies/venous ultrasounds can also determine if there is a blood clot in the deep vein system of the legs.
    • Arterial Ultrasound: Arterial ultrasounds measure the amount of blood flow in the arteries of the legs and arms. This can determine if there is any narrowing or blockages.
    • Ankle Brachial Index (ABI): ABI’s measure the blood pressure in the upper and lower extremities. It will create a ratio that can give insight to a possible blockage in legs that is impeding blood flow to the legs from the heart.
    • Event Monitor: This test is designed for patients who are having episodes of palpitations. This monitor is worn on the skin from 48 hours to 30 days. It will record the heart rate and rhythm and determine if there are any possible arrhythmias.
    • PT/INR Check: If the patient is taking a certain blood thinner, the patient will need to have a PT/INR check. This determines how fast it takes for the patient’s blood to form a clot. Each patient has a target range for their PT/INR when they are on blood thinners and this test can tell them if they are within that range.
    • CTA Chest/Aorta: CTA’s use contrast injected into the patient’s body to take a picture of the aorta and heart. It can determine if there is any calcification in the arteries or abnormalities to the aorta.

FDR

  • Transesophageal Echocardiogram (TEE): If the physician needs a closer look at the back of the heart and more detail than what an echocardiogram is able to provide, a TEE is recommended. This testing involves sending an ultrasound probe down the esophagus and gather pictures of the heart similar to an echocardiogram. This procedure allows the physician to get a better look at the heart’s valves and chambers.
  • Tilt Table: The tilt table test is a good way to determine the cause of syncope (fainting). The test consists of lying down on a bed while it is tilted at different angles. At that time, your blood pressure and oxygen is being monitored are being monitored as well as an EKG reading is present.