Vein Disease

FDRVenous insufficiency develops when the valves in the veins are not closing properly causing the blood flow to return to the foot.

A special ultrasound called a reflux study will be used to determine the severity of the disease.

  • Symptoms: leg pain, swelling (edema), redness, itching, spider veins, varicose veins, open ulcers, cramping, and leg heaviness/fatigue.
  • Risk Factors: age, family history, prolonged standing, obesity, current or previous pregnancies and smoking
  • Treatment: Life changes, compression stockings, radiofrequency ablations, Venaseal and sclerotherapy FDRFDR
    • Lifestyle Changes: Walking more frequently, losing weight and limiting the amount of time on your feet
    • Compression Stockings: The 20-30mmHg thigh-high or knee-high compression stockings are recommended. If the patient experiences improvement with the compression stockings, then the patient is a good candidate for Vein Ablation.
    • Radiofrequency Ablations: This procedure uses radiofrequency ablation (heat) to direct the blood flow from the incompetent vein to the more competent vein in the deep system. Local anesthesia will be given at the time of the procedure to numb the area prior to making a small incision/puncture for catheter placement for heating of the vein.
    • FDRFDR

    • Venaseal: This procedure uses a biomedical adhesive delivered by a catheter, to seal off the incompetent vein to reroute the blood to the more competent vein in the deep system. Local anesthesia will be given at the time of the procedure to numb the area prior to making a small incision/puncture for the catheter that delivers the adhesive.
    • Sclerotherapy: This procedure treats spider veins and is usually not covered by the insurance as it is considered cosmetic treatment. After evaluating the area, a very small needle will be used to inject the Asclera medication into the veins. This medication increases the blood flow to the area and improves the look of spider veins.